Rheumatism -- Treatment.

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Rheumatism -- Treatment.

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Rheumatism -- Treatment.

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Rheumatism -- Treatment.

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Bardism; miscellanea,

A volume (pp. i-xxii; 1-449) containing miscellaneous items, many relating to Welsh bardism, in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). The contents include pp. 1-3, a note re the proclamation in 1795 of a bardic meeting to be held at Pen Bryn Owain in co. Glamorgan in 1796; 3-7, notes re the times of holding bardic meetings ('Cadair a Gorsedd wrth Gerdd a Barddoniaeth'), etc.; 7-16, eleven rules under the superscription 'Darbodau Gorsedd Gyfallwy Cadair Morganwg . . . ar Benn Brynn Owain ym Morganwg . . . 1795' relating to the conduct of bardic meetings, the measures, content, and language of poems, the bards, etc.; 25-8, a note of a proclamation in 1798 of a 'Cadair a Gorsedd ar Gerdd a Barddoniaeth' to be held at Pen Brynn Owain in co. Glamorgan in twelve months time, notes on the times of holding future bardic meetings '. . . ymmraint Cadair Orsedd Morganwg . . . ar ben Twyn Owain', and a geographical definition of the term Morgannwg in this context; 35-44., notes headed 'Coelbren y Beirdd herwydd Llyfr Llywelyn Siôn' being notes relating to the special alphabet reputedly devised by the Welsh bards for carving or notching on wooden surfaces and different modes of constructing wooden appliances or so-called 'books' which could be used as writing surfaces when utilising this alphabet; 51, an incomplete version of a 'question and answer' conversation between a teacher and his disciple; 55-6, notes relating to early British bards called 'gwyddoniaid', a bardic meeting between Prydain ab Aedd Mawr and three of these bards called Plennydd, Alawn, and Gwron ('Tri Phrif Feirdd Ynys Prydain'), rules for the bardic order formulated then, etc.; 57-60, English definitions of, or notes in Welsh on, terms of bardic relevance, e.g. 'Alban', 'Gorsedd Arddangos', 'Arwest', 'Cerdd Arwest'; 63-73, extracts of varying length from the works of Welsh poets ? illustrating bardic or poetic terms ('Bardic Allusions from the Welsh Bards'); 79, a note on 'Colofn Prydain (sef felly y gelwir y Gyhydedd Gyrch yn Llyfr Gm. Tew)'; 80-82, notes on Welsh literary production up to and including the fifteenth century mentioning Dafydd ap Gwilym, Llawdden, Harri ap Rhys ap Gwilym, Ieuan Brechfa, Edeyrn dafawd aur, Einiawn offeiriad, Dafydd Ddu Hiraddug, and Hopkin ap Thomas; 82-6, notes relating to an 'eisteddfod' held under the patronage of Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Tewdwr in Aberteifi and to rules concerning the order of bards and musicians formulated there; 87-8, brief notes on the bardic 'cadair arddangos' and 'cadair dwmpath'; 89, a note relating to the original of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, an extract from the said work, and a note on 'a circumstance . . . exactly similar' in a poem by Dafydd ap Gwilym; 90-91, notes on Dafydd ap Gwilym and his poetry; 92-4, notes on the Welsh alphabet; 95-? 104, the rules and customs of the bardic chair of Tir Iarll ('Trefnau a Defodau Cadair Tir Iarll'); 111-13, bardic miscellanea; 119- 22, notes relating to the rights, etc., of the bardic order with the superscription 'Llyma ddangos amrafaelion o arferion a breiniau a defodau a barnau a chyfarwyddyd a berthynent i Feirdd a gwyr wrth gerdd o'r hen Lyfrau'; 127-33, notes on 'Cerdd Gadair', 'Cerdd Deuluaidd', 'Clergerdd', 'Datgeiniad Cadair', and 'Datgeiniad Penpastwn'; (continued)

135-7 + 145, further notes re rules for bardic meetings; 142, two triads; 143-4 + 155, notes relating to ? the Welsh bardic alphabet; 154, a note on 'Tair colofn Barddoniaeth'; 157-9, notes relating to the alleged association between (a) Gruffudd ap Cynan and Bleddyn ap Cynfyn and the code of rules for the bardic order, (b) Bleddyn ap Cynfyn and 'regulations for genealogies and armorial bearings', (c) Rhys ap Tewdwr and the introduction of the 'Bardic Laws of the Round Table' from Armorica, and (d) Gruffudd ap Cynan and 'a musical sessions in Glyn Achlach in Ireland . . . 1096'; 171-4, a transcript of twelve stanzas of Welsh verse attributed to Siencyn o'r Crwys y Prydydd; 174, a list of 'Plant Caw o Brydyn'; 175, a transcript of a twelve-line Welsh stanza allegedly composed by Thomas Glyn Cothi on the occasion of the French landing at Fishguard in 1797; 176-7, genealogical data relating to the family of Iestyn ab Gwrgan and related families; 178, a transcript of an 'englyn' relating to Owain Glyn Dyfrdwy attributed to Ieuan Gethin ap Ieuan ap Lleision; 179, a few entries relating to events in Welsh history, 870-959; 180, a transcript of 'englynion' ? attributed to Hywel Ystoryn; 181-6, an anecdote and notes relating to ? the reputed poetesses of Ty Talwyn, parish of Llangynwyd [co. Glamorgan]; 187 + 193, skeleton notes on Llanilid, Llanharan, Llanhari, Llantrisaint, St. Donats, and Flimston [co. Glamorgan]; 188-9, historical and other notes relating to the parish of Merthyr Tydvil [co. Glamorgan]; 190, a list of 'Antiquities in and about Merthyr'; 191, a note on Mallt Walbi 'a Brecon virago' and leader of a gang of freebooters, and a list of 'Remarkable Parishes' [in Glamorgan]; 192, a list of 'Antiquities in and about Lantwit Major' [co. Glamorgan]; 205, extracts relating to 'Melchin, an ancient British author', 'Hu Gadarn', etc., 'Ex Celtic Remains by Lewis Morris'; 206-07, a note on heroic poetry and the attitude of the 'descendants of the Celts' towards it; 219- 22, comments on orthography arising out of [William] Owen [Pughe]'s innovations with regard to Welsh orthography; 223-7, notes relating to the formation of compounds and plurals of monosyllabic words in ancient Cimbric and modern Welsh; 227-39, notes relating to the original home of the Cymry and early druidism and bardism, etc.; 241, a short list of Welsh words relating to worship with English definitions; 242-4, notes on the principles of druidism; 246-51, notes relating to the 'Great Eisteddfod at Caermarthen' [? 1451], 'the system of versification that received the sanction of that Eisteddfod', the adoption of this system by the bards of North Wales and some of those of South Wales, its rejection by the bards of Glamorgan and their compilation of 'a system of discipline, of Poetical Criticism, of Versification, and of whatever appertained to their science', the death of the Carmarthen system during the reign of James I, Gronwy Owen's verse, and the Gwyneddigion Society's annual Welsh poetry competition and its attempt 'to restore the system of the Carmarthen Eisteddfod'; 252-4, notes relating to an 'eisteddfod' held at Nant Gonwy, 1 Edward IV, incorporating 'englynion' attributed to Dafydd ap Edmund and Twm Tegid Brydydd 'o Langower ym Mhenllyn'; 259-66 + 274-82, an outline journal of a journey from South to North Wales and back, July-August 1800, the places mentioned on the northward journey including Cowbridge, Bridgend, Neath, Caeo, Dolau Cothi, Pumsaint, Clydogau Mountain, Llanfair Cludogeu, Llandewi Brevi, Tregaron, Pont Rhyd Fendigaid, Hafod, Pont ar fynach, Llanbadarn, Aberdyfi, Towyn, Dolgelleu, and Blaeneu (a visit to [Rhys Jones, antiquary and poet] and transcribing of manuscripts), and on the return journey Llanfachreth, Dolgelley (mention here of harpists and of the origin of the triple-stringed harp), Carneddi Hengwm, Tal y llynn, Abergyrnolwyn, Aberdyfi, Aberystwyth, Llanrhystid, Tal y sarn, New Inn, Abergwily, Caerm[arthe]n, Llangyndeyrn, Pont y Berem, Llan Nonn, Cydwely, Llanelly, Pont ar Ddulais, Swansea, Llangynwyd, and Bridgend; 262, a transcript of twelve lines of English verse entitled 'Loyalty by a Cobler'; 264, a transcript of an 'englyn' attributed to Huw Llwyd Cynfel; 270-73, a Welsh saints' calendar; 306, a plan of a 'Sheepfold at the foot of Cadair Idris, another in ruins on the same plan Cefn Merthyr, several more in Glamorgan'; (continued)

307, a transcript of the 'title-page' of Edward Jones: The Bardic Museum of Primitive British Literature . . .; 308-13, a series of eleven Welsh triads ('Llyma Drioedd y Beirdd') with an English translation thereof extracted from pp. 1-4 of the aforementioned Bardic Museum by Edward Jones; 316, a medicinal recipe for rheumatism in the head; 317, a 'Plan of a school house or accademy'; 323-38, extracts from Sharon Turner: History . . . of the Anglo-Saxons [vol. IV], relating to the language, literature, and music of the Anglo - Saxons; 339-43, notes on, and extracts from, [Walter] Scott's 'Lay of the Last Minstrel'; 359-62, extracts from a review of Edward Moor: The Hindu Pantheon which appeared in The Edinburgh Review, February 1811; 367-70, brief notes relating to the poetic dialect of the Welsh bards, the 'ancient [Welsh] Prose dialect', 'the modern [Welsh] literary Dialect', and 'The Venedotian Dialect' and its use in literature, and comments on the efforts of 'A Welsh (would-be literary) Society in London . . . to patronize the Welsh Language'; 373-80, notes relating to the introduction of Scaldic bardism into North Wales in the time of Gruffudd ap Cynan and the consequent disappearance of the old British bardism in that part of the country, the preservation of the old bardism in Glamorgan, and the invigorating effect of the 'Scaldic manner or system' on Welsh poetry and the Welsh language, general comments on the moral tone of Welsh literature, etc.; 381, three 'grammatical' triads; 382, a very brief list of Irish words in the Venedotian dialect; 383, an extract 'Ex Vol. 35 Plas Gwynn Mon' [i.e. Panton MS 35 now NLW MS 2003] relating to the 'dymchwelawl' poetic metre; 384, a note relating to an old manuscript volume containing Welsh miracle plays in the possession of 'Dr. Thomas yn Llwyn Iwrch' in the eighteenth century; 385-6, comments on the practice of calling 'the ancient British Religion Druidical'; 387-9, general observations on the development of the 'system of versification and of poetical criticism . . . of the Welsh Bards'; 390, a brief note on 'Bardism or Druidism'; 391-2, a list of fourteen chapter headings for a proposed 'History of the Bards' [? by Edward Williams], with a note at the beginning 'A Bad Plan' and at the end 'The above is only the first rude sketch of 1791 and here only retained as containing a few hints that may be useful' (in addition to material on British / Welsh bardism and druidism and Welsh music this work was to contain chapters on Irish and Highland bards, Scandinavian scalds, Provencal troubadours, and Saxon and English minstrels); 392-4, a list of thirty-six topics or subject or chapter headings being 'Another arrangement' [presumably for the proposed 'History of the Bards']; 395, a transcript of three 'englynion' attributed to Gutto'r Glyn, the third being attributed also to H[ywel] D[afydd] I[eua] n Rhys (an accompanying note mentions an 'eisteddfod' at Cardiff Castle); 396-7, a list of six 'Topics for the Bards Common Place book'; 398, a list of dates ? in connection with the holding of 'eisteddfodau' at Ystrad Ywain [co. Glamorgan]; 399-400, notes relating to the 'Polity or Discipline' of the druids and bards; 407, a list of fourteen 'names given by the ancient Bards to the Coronog faban' (part Welsh, part English, and derived from [Thomas] Pugh [: Brittish and Out-landish] Prophesies . . . [ London, 1658]); 408-18, notes relating largely to early British bardism and druidism with mention of [James] MacPherson and the Ossianic poems; 423-5, miscellaneous triads, etc.; 426 + 430-31, general reflections relating to etymology; 427-9, reflections on the use of conjecture in history particularly 'with respect to the peopling of Europe and America' if no historical records were available; 431-3, notes relating to the dissension between the bards of North Wales and those of Glamorgan consequent upon the 'succesful attempt of Daf[ydd] ab Edmund at the Caermarthen Congress [? 1451] to establish his own system [of versification]', the researches undertaken by the Glamorgan bards into 'Bardic history and science' and their discovery of 'the true principles of Poetry and versification', etc.; 435-7, notes containing general reflections on changes in the Welsh language and poetry from the late thirteenth century onwards; and 438, a list of six Welsh triads.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Miscellanea,

A volume (pp. 5-310) containing items of an extremely varied nature in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Included, pagination in brackets, are lists or groups of Welsh words, sometimes with English definitions or equivalents or notes (17, 25, 29, 34, 38, 43, 47, 53, 80-82, 89, 102, 125-6, 134, 142, 157, 161, 170, 182, 196, 203, 219-20, 225, 235-6, 238, 242, 245, 247, 263, 282, 292); extracts from Aneurin's 'Gododdin' headed 'Silldorriadau Gododin' (119-20); notes, sometimes very brief, on or relating to Welsh bardism (21, 27, 57, 72, 127, 156, 187, 192-3, 195, 244, 258), song writing (32), the characteristics of the work of Cattwg, Taliesin, and Aneurin (32), the coming of the Cymry to Britain from Deffrobani and their loss of sovereignty to the Romans and Saxons (36), the knowledge of letters amongst the ancient Britons (37), King Arthur's court (46), the 'modern literary dialect of the Welsh' and the medieval prose and verse of South Wales (49), Welsh poetic metres called ' traethodyn milwr', 'traethodyn cwtta', and 'traethodyn chweban' (52), Merfyn Gwawdrych, 9th cent., and his contemporaries (61), the poet Twm ab Ifan ab Rhys, ? early 17th cent. (69), 'cynghanedd' and the Welsh strict poetic metres with references to an 'eisteddfod' in the time of Ifor ab Ifor of Maeshaleg, a bardic assembly at the monastery of Penrys [co. Glamorgan], temp. Edward IV, when Gwilym Tew exhibited an 'awdl', etc. (77- 8), white blackbirds and sparrows seen at Landough and wild canaries at Lantwit [co. Glamorgan] (98), the relinquishment or retention of ancient arts by nations in proportion to their progress (104), Siôn Rhydderch and his Welsh grammar [Grammadeg Cymraeg, 1728] (119), the use of the prefixes an- and di- in Welsh (133), 'Tair Cynghanedd Anianol' (150 ), 'Cynghanedd ewinog' (151), the use of various rhymes and 'cynganeddion' in Welsh (152), bardic 'cadeiriau' of or at Llanfihangel Glyn Afan, 1355, Llangynwyd, 1452, Y Wenar, 1462, and Tir Iarll, 1488 (159), the two sounds of the letter Y in Welsh (160), the bardic 'Cadair Tir Iarll' (185), the construction of 'Coelbren y Beirdd' (242), the bard Owain ap Rhydderch, late 15th cent. (273), and manifestations or representations of God (290- 91); transcripts of Welsh poems or stanzas of Welsh poems or extracts therefrom attributed to Llelo Llantrisaint sef Llywelyn ap Hywel ap Ieuan ap Gronw (23), [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' (50, 68, 82, 87, 217), ? Twm ab Ifan ab Rhys (69), Llawdden (129-30), Wm. Moses (149), Taliesin (240, 242), Thos. Daf. Miles (266), Syr Roger Cyffin 'offeiriad Llanberis' (267), and Risiart Fychan 'o Gors y Gedol' (268); transcripts of unattributed Welsh poems including stanzas of hymn-tunes (23-4, 30, 34, 45, 51, 104, 115, 116, 121, 128, 1311, 148, 175, 191, 213, 232-3, 234, 274 + 283, 278-80); transcripts of English poems (107, 197, 212, 261, 284 + 273); miscellaneous Welsh triads (33, 172, 206, 247); short lists of Welsh proverbs or proverbial sayings (48, 167, 176, 231, 293); a prescription for the cure of rheumatism (50); an anecdote relating to the struggle between Caradawc ab Bran ap Llyr and the Romans, the burning of forests in Britain, and the building by Manawydan fab Llyr of a prison called 'Carchar Oeth ag Anoeth' from the bones of those slain in battle, allegedly extracted from [a manuscript called] the 'Yniales' (65-8; for another copy of the anecdote see NLW MS 13152A above); a prefatory note to an intended collection of proverbs, moral aphorisms, etc., allegedly composed or compiled by Cattwg Ddoeth (73-4); a list of old Welsh musical instruments ('Offerynau Cerdd arwest yr hen Gymry') (80); a transcript of the opening paragraph of an alleged version of 'Gramadeg Einiawn Offeiriad' (83); notes on (a) the situation and extent, and (b) the divisions of the county of Glamorgan being sections 1 and 2 of a projected chapter to be headed 'Geographical State and Circumstances' which presumably would have been Chapter 1 of a work on the said county (91-2); an incomplete list of bardic, literary, and other topics in English and Welsh, e.g. 'Cannons of Etymology', 'Miscellanies relating to Welsh poetry', 'Achau Saint Ynys Prydain', 'MSS. in Jesus College Library', under the superscription 'Collecting Sheets 8vo' (99); a list of nine topics such as 'Diarhebion Morganwg Annosparthus', 'Mangofion Gwynedd 1799', etc. (101); (continued)

A list of thirteen topics, e.g. 'Princes of Southwales', 'Anecdotes of Howel Dda', 'Meddygon Myddfai', etc., headed 'For Mr. Rees, Caermarthen' (105); copies of memorial inscriptions ? in St. Athan parish church (107-08); a list of six rules headed 'Unitarian Discipline' (113); a list of fifteen topics or personal names of a varying nature, e.g. 'Llangyndeyrn Marble at Caerm[arthe]n', 'Donne the Satirist', 'Taly Llycheu Church, D.G.' (114); a list of eight 'Ysgriflyfrau gan Iolo Morganwg 1800' (127); a list of Welsh proverbial sayings or advisory precepts some in verse form and some attributed to Cattwg Ddoeth (141, 144-6); a list of the names of six series of Welsh triads (147); a list of the names of thirteen persons headed 'Selfeducated persons in Glamorgan Vale' and a second list containing the names of eight persons headed 'Glamorgan Mountains' the persons named in this list apparently belonging to the same category as those in the first list (158); a list of eight topics or items, e.g. 'Llythyrau Dafydd o'r Nant', 'Rheolau Tudur Aled', etc., which were to be included in an unspecified work (164); brief genealogical data relating to the family of Einiawn Offeiriad (171); a list of Welsh 'Enwau Llefydd' ( 172); brief incomplete notes relating to the development of Welsh literature headed 'English Preface to Cyfrinach y Beirdd' (214); an explanatory note on 'cynghanedd groes' in the form of question and answer between pupil and master (251-2); a draft of a memorial and remonstrance to the members of, and subscribers to, the 'Fund of the South Wales Unitarian Society for the Diffusion of Christian Knowledge' expressing concern at irregularities in the conduct of the society (265 + 260); patterns or examples of metres and metric lines headed 'Specimens of Welsh Lyrics and Verse' (262); a list of the names of six Welsh bards, 1650-80, to refute L[ewis] Morys's assertion that no good 'cywydd' had been written since the reign of Elizabeth (267); brief notes on the activities of [John] Poyer and [Rowland] Laugharne in the Civil War in South Wales and a list of English sovereigns, 1603-1760 (269); ? observations on a proposed 'Essay on the Ancient Welsh Literature', etc. (271); synopses of the contents of ? six chapters of a proposed 'Collection for a New History of Wales from Ancient Welsh MSS.' ('On the Origin of the Cimbri', 'Principles of Ancient British Government', 'The Ancient Institution of the Bards', etc.) (272); music for an unspecified air (296); and notes and a sketch relating to a plan of a 'meeting house, octagonal or circular' (298). Some of the notes, etc., have been written on the verso or in the margins of a copy of a printed notice by White and Barnards, Barge Masters, advertising their services, 1800 (100), a copy of a printed notice issued by the Caslon Letter Foundry, London, advertising their preparedness to provide printing types and materials (123), imperfect copies of a printed leaflet, 1797, announcing an 'eisteddfod' to be held under the patronage of the Gwyneddigion Society in 1798 (142-3, 204-05), a copy of printed proposals, 1811, for a new edition of 'The History of Wales written originally in Welsh by Caradoc of Llancarvan translated into English by Dr. Powell and augmented by W. Wynne' (194 + 191), 'An Exemplification of Masons' Work done for Robert Jones, Esqr., of Fonmon Castle . . . Burton Causway by William Baker, Mason, 1813 and 18[14] as attested by Thos. Raecliff and Edward Williams in 1814 (198-9, 210-11), a ? holograph letter from R. Evans from Cowbridge to . . ., undated (personal) (220-21), an account for goods purchased by E. Williams [? 'Iolo Morganwg'] from James Bradley, chemist, Cowbridge, in 1816 (226 + 239), a printed calendar of prisoners in ? Cardiff Gaol, ? 1803 (227 + 238), a copy of printed proposals for publishing George Dyer's Memoirs of the Life and Writings of . . . Robert Robinson of Chesterton (234 + 231), and a ? holograph note from Thomas William to Edward Williams [? 'Iolo Morganwg'], 1814, informing him that Christopher ? James wished to see him (259 + 266).

'Iolo Morganwg'.